Catalysis, Synthesis

Iron-catalyzed C-H Borylation

“Iron-Catalyzed C-H Borylation of Arenes” Dombray, T.; Werncke, C. G.; Jiang, S.; Grellier, M.; Vendier, L.; Bontemps, S.; Sortais, J-B.; Sabo-Etienne, S.; Darcel, C. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, ASAP. DOI: 10.1021/jacs.5b00895

C-H borylation, itself a green reaction for generating useful borylated compounds, is traditionally catalyzed by Ir and Rh. Much of the work has been conducted by John Hartwig’s group at Berkeley and Mitch Smith’s group at Michigan St. French scientists have now reported an iron-catalyzed version, which complements recent reports with Co complexes and dinuclear transition metal complexes. I especially like that the reported reaction is free of H2 acceptors and utilizes light to activate the catalyst.

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Synthesis

Update: Improving atom economy of dehydrogenative decarbonylation

“Selective Metal-Catalyzed Transfer of H2 and CO from Polyols to Alkenes” Verendel, J. J.; Nordlund, M.; Andersson, P. G. ChemSusChem, 2013, 6, 426-429. DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201200843

In a recent post I commented on the byproducts of dehydrogenative decarbonylation, namely H2 and CO.

1st reaction scheme

I wondered whether this gas mixture, syngas, could be used in a subsequent reaction. This would improve the atom efficiency of the reaction and potentially also improve the safety (of both the syngas-producing and syngas-using reactions). Both are goals of green chemistry and I especially appreciate avoiding rolling cylinders of toxic and/or flammable gases around the lab.

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Environmental Chemistry

Green Chemistry on your Smart Phone!

“Incorporating Green Chemistry Concepts into Mobile Chemistry Applications and Their Potential Uses.” Ekins, S.; Clark, A. M.; Williams, A. J. ACS Sustainable Chem. Eng. 2013, 1, 8-13. DOI: 10.1021/sc3000509

We here at GreenChemBlog have not posted in a while, but still hope to post and are still looking for contributors to the blog. Posts might be a bit shorter going forward, though, in order for us to post more frequently.

I’ve expanded my reading recently to include a new ACS journal, ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering. In the first issue is the above article, which highlights a few recent additions to the smart phone/tablet world that utilize green chemistry!
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Synthesis

Rh-catalyzed Alcohol Deoxygenation

“Acceptorless Photocatalytic Dehydrogenation for Alcohol Decarbonylation and Imine Synthesis.” Ho, H-A.; Manna, K.; Sadow, A. D. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2012, 51, 8607-8610. DOI: 10.1002/anie.201203556

The use of biorenewables as feedstock chemicals for commodity chemicals as well as fuels requires mild, selective removal of oxygen-containing functional groups. This is in direct contrast to the production of these chemicals from petroleum products, which, at least for highly functionalized target molecules, necessarily involves oxygenation of hydrocarbons.

There are a large amount of methods development currently underway and I highlight the recent report from the Sadow group on the decarbonylation of alcohols under Rh catalysis. I think the described reaction is a good example of green chemistry, as the reaction is high-yielding, selective, and performed at room temperature under photocatalytic conditions. One serious drawback is the use of benzene as the solvent, although toluene works as a solvent in at least some cases.

Reasoning that photolysis would prevent catalyst inhibition by CO binding, the researchers first screened Rh(I) catalysts under photocatalytic conditions with the test substrate cyclohexanemethanol. Unfortunately, no cyclohexane was observed under these reaction conditions. The group then tested Rh and Ir compounds known for C-H activation, such as Cp*Ir(CO)2 and Tp*Rh(CO)2, and did observe cyclohexane for one of the tested catalysts, albeit in low yield (36 % NMR yield with Tp*Rh(CO)2). CO and H2 were also observed, consistent with the targeted alcohol decarbonylation reaction. Interestingly, using their previously reported rhodium tris(oxazolinyl)borate complex ToMRh(CO)2 (1) improved the yield to > 95%. Furthermore, the related dihydride, ToMRh(H)2CO (2) was roughly three times slower and the Ir complex ToMIr(CO)2 was inactive for this reaction.

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Toxicology

Toxicity of Iron Nanoparticles

“Stabilization or Oxidation of Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron at Environmentally Relevant Exposure Changes Bioavailability and Toxicity in Medaka Fish” Chen, P-J; Tan, S-W; Wu, W-L. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2012, ASAP. DOI: 10.1021/es3006783

We’ve posted before on iron-catalyzed reactions (see here for a recent post) as greener alternatives to more traditional platinum group catalyzed reactions. However, even iron has toxicity concerns as described in this paper from National Taiwan University on the toxicity in medaka fish of  zerovalent iron (nZVI) nanoparticles (NPs). This is particularly pertinent research in light of the increased usage of iron(0) nanomaterials in remediation.

The study investigates the effects of four different iron dosing ‘solutions’ on the molecular, cellular and organismal health of medaka larvae: (i) carboxymethylcellulose stabilized nZVI (CMC-nZVI), (ii) non-stabilized nZVI (nZVI), (iii) magnetite NPs (nFe3O4), and (iv) soluble Fe(II).

They first characterize the dosing solutions. The sizes of their nanoparticles are 75 nm, 25-75 nm, and 27 nm for CMC-nZVI, nZVI, and nFe3O4 respectively. The zeta potentials were measured to show, not surprisingly, that the CMC-stabilized particles are much more stable to aggregation than the non-stabilized nZVI.

Interestingly, of the four iron dosing solutions, CMC-nZVI has the most significant impact on the level of dissolved oxygen, decreasing it to zero where it remained for 12 hours. Furthermore, this aerobic oxidation of CMC-nZVI leads to a release of 45 mg/L of soluble Fe(II) in 10 min from an initial concentration of 100 mg/L CMC-nZVI as well as an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, nZVI and nFe3O4 are 20 – 40 % aggregated within 10 min and release less than 20 mg/L of Fe(II) during this time. Only nZVI induces the production of ROS with nFe3O4 and soluble Fe(II) showing no increase in ROS relative to the control. The following figure details these findings for CMC-nZVI; analogous graphs are found in the supplementary information for the other solutions.

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Toxicology

Benign By Design: Synthetic Guidelines for Low Chronic Aquatic Toxicity

“Towards Rational Molecular Design for Reduced Chronic Aquatic Toxicity” Voutchkova-Kostal, A. M.; Kostal, J.; Connors, K. A.; Brooks, B. W.; Anastas, P. T.; Zimmerman, J. B. Green Chem. 2012, 14, 1001-1008. DOI: 10.1039/C2GC16385C

As a synthetic chemist with little (actually zero) training in toxicology, it’s difficult for me to imagine how to design safer chemicals at the start of a project. I can avoid nasty solvents, use safer reagents, but when designing a new molecule I haven’t a clue of its potential toxicological impact. This is frustrating and as the authors of the above paper in Green Chemistry point out, “with the growing number of new chemicals being introduced into the market, it is not economically or ethically reasonable to assume that each can undergo systematic toxicological testing […]”. Thus, possessing a set of easy-to-implement synthetic guidelines to reduce the toxicity of a synthetic target during the design stage, while maintaining (or better yet, augmenting) its function, is of high importance.

Recently, the Zimmerman group reported on guidelines for reducing acute aquatic toxicity and have now extended their work to chronic aquatic toxicity. This is an important next step because chronic toxicity studies are necessarily longer-term (and thus more resource intensive) than acute toxicity studies.

In the current work, they explore the relationships between 38 physicochemical properties of 865 chemicals with chronic aquatic toxicity toward three model organisms: the Japanese medaka, a cladoceran, and a green algae. The 38 properties include, for example, molecular weight, number of freely rotatable bonds, aqueous solubility, and number of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors. Continue reading

Synthesis

Iron-Catalyzed C-H Amination

“Iron-Catalyzed Intramolecular Allylic C-H Amination” Paradine, S. M.; White, M. C. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 2036-2039. DOI: 10.1021/ja211600g

In their recent communication, Christina White’s group at Illinois reports a new allylic C-H amination catalyzed by iron. This builds on previous work from their group in Pd sulfoxide catalyzed allylic amination and iron catalyzed C-H oxidation. In addition to showcasing an exciting reaction, this paper is a great contribution from a green chemistry perspective: they use a cheap, non-toxic metal catalyst to do a highly selective C-H oxidation reaction, one that streamlines the synthesis of C-N bonds directly from the (relatively) unreactive C-H bond. Interestingly, quantitative comparisons are made throughout the paper to the more commonly used Rh2(OAc)4 catalyst.

They start by screening Fe catalysts for intramolecular allylic amination reactivity of sulfamate substrates. Although the polypyridyl Fe complex they have used previously for hydroxylation and desaturation chemistry gave a low yield of product, the phthalocyanine Fe complex 1 gave a good yield (and better than a tetraphenylporphyrin iron complex) of allylic amination. Importantly, they obtained only trace quantities of the aziridination product, showing the high selectivity of the iron-catalyzed reaction (>20:1).

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